Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are words or group of words that make one part of the sentence dependent on the rest of the sentence. Don’t hesitate to also check our 236 free and powerful practice tests

The next lesson: Gerund, Infinitive, and Participle, both lessons are included in Practice Tests.

The following transcript is provided for your convenience.

Take a look at what I mean. This sentence says:

The organization will exist as long as there is ample funding.”

As long as” is the subordinating conjunction in this sentence.

Now, “the organization will exist” could be a sentence by itself. You put a period right there. And, “there is ample funding” could also be a sentence by itself. Those two sentences could stand alone.

But, when we add to this first sentence, “the organization will exist as long as“, it makes that sentence dependent on something else, because if we were just to say “the organization will exist as long as“, that leaves us hanging. That’s a fragment. It needs some other words to go along with it to make it a complete sentence.

So:

The organization will exist as long as there is ample funding.”

So, “as long as” is the subordinating conjunction, making the first part of the sentence dependent on something else to complete this sentence.

Let’s look at one more example.

Since it is noon, let’s eat lunch.”

Since” right here is the subordinating conjunction. Remember, I said a subordinating conjunction can be one word or a group of words, so up here, it was three words. Sometimes, a subordinating conjunction is two words, and then, often, it is just one word, like “since“.

So, here, it says:

Since it is noon, let’s eat lunch.”

Now, again, “let’s eat lunch” can be a sentence by itself, and “it is noon” can be a sentence by itself. But, when we add “since” to “it is noon“, it makes this part of the sentence dependent on some other words to complete the sentence, because if we just said “Since it is noon“, that wouldn’t make any sense. That would be a fragment because it’s incomplete.

So, a subordinating conjunction makes the rest of the sentence dependent on something else to complete it. That way, “Since it is noon, let’s eat lunch” makes sense.

Practice tests help you remember. Take this mini-test to solidify your memory.

Mini-test: Subordinating Conjunctions 

Complete the sentence by choosing the clause that begins with a subordinating conjunction.

1.  I like oranges …
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
2. Let’s go to a museum …
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

 


The next lesson: Gerund, Infinitive, and Participle, both lessons are included in Practice Tests.

subordinating-conjunctions




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