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Practice Test – Language (RLA) set 6

These questions are written by our English Language guru and are similar to the GED Test. Each question has five answer choices. Choose the best answer for each question.

 

Question 1 of 25

1.

ARE YOU FIT FOR HIRING?


Fit for Hiring? It’s Mind Over Matter.


By Judith H. Dobrzynski, New York Times


NEW YORK – Members of America’s professional and managerial classes have always left college confident of at least one thing: they had taken their last test. From here on, they could rely on charm, cunning and/or a record of accomplishment to propel them up the corporate ladder.


            But that’s not necessarily true any longer. A growing number of companies, from General Motors Corp to American Express Co., are longer satisfied with traditional job interviews. Instead, they are requiring applicants for many white-collar jobs – from top executives down – to submit to a series of paper-and-pencil tests, role-playing exercises, simulated decision-making exercises and brainteasers. Other put candidates through a long series of interviews by psychologists or trained interviewers.


            The tests are not about mathematics or grammar, nor about any of the basic technical skills for which many production, sales and clerical workers have long been tested. Rather, employers want to evaluate candidates on intangible qualities: Is she creative and entrepreneurial? Can he lead and coach? Is he flexible and capable of learning? Does she have passion and a sense of urgency? How will he function under pressure? Most important, will the potential recruit fit the corporate culture?


            These tests, which can take from an hour to two days, are part of a broader trend. ‘Companies are getting much more careful about hiring,’ said Paul R. Ray Jr., chairman of the Association of Executive Search Consultants.


            Ten years ago, candidates could win a top job with the right look and the right answers to questions such as ‘Why do you want this job?’. Now, many are having to face questions and exercises intended to learn how they get things done.


             They may, for example, have to describe in great detail not one career accomplishment but many – so that patterns of behavior emerge. They may face questions such as, ‘Who is the best manager you ever worked for and why?’ or ‘What is your best friend like?’. The answers, psychologists say, reveal much about a candidate’s management style and about himself or herself.



Which of the following interview questions are the job applicants most UNLIKELY to face with according to the excerpt?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 1 of 25

Question 2 of 25

2. Running down the hill in Summer time, a dog started to chase after me.

What correction should be made to the underlined portion of the sentence above?
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 2 of 25

Question 3 of 25

3. Running down the hill in Summer time, a dog started to chase after me.

What problem in sentence structure does the above sentence have?
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 3 of 25

Question 4 of 25

4.

THE KIDS WHO BEAT AUTISM

 

(A)

 

(1)At first, everything about L.'s baby boy seemed normal. (2) _____ met every developmental milestone and delighted in every discovery. (3)But at around twelve months, B. seemed to regress, and by age 2, he had fully retreated into his own world. (4)He no longer made eye contact, neither did he seem to hear, no longer seemed to understand the random words he sometimes spoke.

 

(B)

 

(5) His easygoing manner gave way to tantrums and head-banging. (6) “He had been this happy, happy little guy,” L. said. “All of a sudden, he was just fading away, falling apart. I can’t even describe my sadness, It was unbearable.” (7)More than anything in the world, L. ___________ her warm and exuberant boy back.

 

(C)

 

(8)A few month later, B. received a diagnosis of autism. (9)His parents were devastated. (10)Soon after, L. attended a conference in Newport, R.I., filled with autism clinicians, researchers and a few desperate parents. (11)At lunch, L. (who asked me to use initials to protect her son’s privacy) sat across from a woman named Jackie, who recounted the disappearance of her own boy. (12)She said the speech therapist had waved it off, blaming ear infections and predicting that Jackie’s son, Matthew, would be fine. (13)She was wrong. (14)Within months, matthew acknowledged no one, not even his parents. (15)The last word he had was “Mama,” and by the time Jackie met L., even that was gone.

 

By Ruth Padawer

What paragraphs should be re-arranged or combined?
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 4 of 25

Question 5 of 25

5.

EDMUND (with alcoholic talkativeness): You've just told me some high spots in your memories. Want to hear mine? They're all connected with the sea. Here's one. When I was on the Squarehead square rigger, bound for Buenos Aires. Full moon in the Trades. The old hooker driving fourteen knots. I lay on the bowsprit, facing astern, with the water foaming into spume under me, the masts with every sail white in the moonlight, towering high above me. I became drunk with the beauty and singing rhythm of it, and for a moment I lost myself -- actually lost my life. I was set free! I dissolved in the sea, became white sails and flying spray, became beauty and rhythm, became moonlight and the ship and the high dim-starred sky! I belonged, without past or future, within peace and unity and a wild joy, within something greater than my own life, or the life of Man, to Life itself! To God, if you want to put it that way. Then another time, on the American Line, when I was lookout on the crow's nest in the dawn watch. A calm sea, that time. Only a lazy ground swell and a slow drowsy roll of the ship. The passengers asleep and none of the crew in sight. No sound of man. Black smoke pouring from the funnels behind and beneath me. Dreaming, not keeping lookout, feeling alone, and above, and apart, watching the dawn creep like a painted dream over the sky and sea which slept together. Then the moment of ecstatic freedom came. The peace, the end of the quest, the last harbor, the joy of belonging to a fulfillment beyond men's lousy, pitiful, greedy fears and hopes and dreams! And several other times in my life, when I was swimming far out, or lying alone on a beach, I have had the same experience. Became the sun, the hot sand, green seaweed anchored to a rock, swaying in the tide. Like a saint's vision of beatitude. Like the veil of things as they seem drawn back by an unseen hand. For a second you see -- and seeing the secret, are the secret. For a second there is meaning! Then the hand lets the veil fall and you are alone, lost in the fog again, and you stumble on toward nowhere, for no good reason!

 

(He grins wryly.)

 

It was a great mistake, my being born a man, I would have been much more successful as a sea gull or a fish. As it is, I will always be a stranger who never feels at home, who does not really want and is not really wanted, who can never belong, who must always be a little in love with death!

 

Eugene O’Neill, excerpted from  Long Day’s Journey Into Night, 1956

What can be inferred about the narrator from his final words, “As it is, I will always be a stranger who never feels at home, who does not really want and is not really wanted, who can never belong,who must always be a little in love with death!”
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 5 of 25

Question 6 of 25

6.

LERNING TO COPE WITH CORPORATE CULTURE CLASHES


 

(1) The dos and don’ts of travelling abroad are a potential minefield for the unprepared traveler. (2) If you spit in some countries, you could end up in prison. (3) In others, spitting is a competitive sport.


 

(4) The Centre for International Briefing has spent 40 years preparing the wary traveller for such pitfalls. (5) Though it may sound like a covert operation for aspiring secret agents, what The Centre does is prepare travellers for encounters with new social and business customs worldwide. (6) To date, over 50,000 people have passed its headquarters at Farnham Castle in Surrey. (7) ‘There are two broad tracks to our training programme’ explains Jeff Toms, Marketing Director. (8) ‘One covers business needs, the other social etiquette. For example, business travellers need to know how decision-making works.’


 

(9) In Asian cultures most of it takes place behind the scenes. (10) In China, it may be necessary to have government involved in any decisions taken. (11) And in India, people are sometimes late for a scheduled appointment.


 

(12) Greetings, gestures and terms of address are all potential hazards abroad. (13) While we are familiar with the firm handshake in this part of the world, in the Middle East the hand is held in a loose grip for a longer time. (14) In Islamic cultures to show the soles of your feet is a sign of disrespect and crossing your legs is seen as offensive.


 

(15) The difference between understanding a culture and ignoring its conventions can be the measure of success or failure abroad. (16) Jeff Toms tells the story of a British employee asked to post a letter by her Indonesian employer. (17) ‘She knew the letter was too late for the 6 o’clock post, so she decided to hold it until the eight o’clock one. (18) Her boss saw the letter on her desk and sacked her for not posting it immediately. (19) In Western cultures, we believe in empowering people and rewarding them for using initiative, and other cultures operate on the basis of obeying direct orders.’



Sentence 2:If you spit in some countries, you could end up in prison.

If you rewrote Sentence 2 beginning with

Spitting in some countries

the second portion of the sentence should be
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 6 of 25

Question 7 of 25

7.

LERNING TO COPE WITH CORPORATE CULTURE CLASHES

 

(1) The dos and don’ts of travelling abroad are a potential minefield for the unprepared traveler. (2) If you spit in some countries, you could end up in prison. (3) In others, spitting is a competitive sport.

 

(4) The Centre for International Briefing has spent 40 years preparing the wary traveller for such pitfalls. (5) Though it may sound like a covert operation for aspiring secret agents, what The Centre does is prepare travellers for encounters with new social and business customs worldwide. (6) To date, over 50,000 people have passed its headquarters at Farnham Castle in Surrey. (7) ‘There are two broad tracks to our training programme’ explains Jeff Toms, Marketing Director. (8) ‘One covers business needs, the other social etiquette. For example, business travellers need to know how decision-making works.’

 

(9) In Asian cultures most of it takes place behind the scenes. (10) In China, it may be necessary to have government involved in any decisions taken. (11) And in India, people are sometimes late for a scheduled appointment.

 

(12) Greetings, gestures and terms of address are all potential hazards abroad. (13) While we are familiar with the firm handshake in this part of the world, in the Middle East the hand is held in a loose grip for a longer time. (14) In Islamic cultures to show the soles of your feet is a sign of disrespect and crossing your legs is seen as offensive.

 

(15) The difference between understanding a culture and ignoring its conventions can be the measure of success or failure abroad. (16) Jeff Toms tells the story of a British employee asked to post a letter by her Indonesian employer. (17) ‘She knew the letter was too late for the 6 o’clock post, so she decided to hold it until the eight o’clock one. (18) Her boss saw the letter on her desk and sacked her for not posting it immediately. (19) In Western cultures, we believe in empowering people and rewarding them for using initiative, and other cultures operate on the basis of obeying direct orders.’

Sentence: Sentence 7: ‘There are two broad tracks to our training programme’ explains Jeff Toms, Marketing Director.Which correction should be made to Sentence 7?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 7 of 25

Question 8 of 25

8.

Used motor vehicles - consumer rights

 

(A)

 

(1) When you buy a used motor vehicle from a trader, you enter into a legally binding contract and you are entitled of expecting that it is of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose, and as described. (2) An older vehicle with high mileage may not be as good as a newer vehicle with low mileage, and it should still be fit for use on the road and in a condition that reflects its age and price.

 

(B)

 

(3) Traders cannot take away consumer’s rights by using terms such as 'sold as seen' or 'no refunds'. (4) You do not have the same legal rights if you buy a vehicle from a private seller or an auction. (5) If you buy a used vehicle from a trader online, you may have additional rights under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000.

 

(C)

 

(6) If the used vehicle is faultyyou have a short time after buying it to reject it. (7) You may have other remedies such as repair or replacement. (8) If the vehicle is faulty then you need to write to trader you bought it from. (9) You should confirm the details of your complaint and the remedy you are seeking and keep copies of all correspondence. (10) Like a last resort, you may need to consider taking court action. (11) Remember, used vehicles may have some faults, but they should not be excessive. (12) Fair wear and tear is not considered to be a fault.

Sentence 1: When you buy a used motor vehicle from a trader, you enter into a legally binding contract and you are entitled of expecting that it is of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose, and as described.Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 8 of 25

Question 9 of 25

9.

Used motor vehicles - consumer rights


 

(A)


 

(1) When you buy a used motor vehicle from a trader, you enter into a legally binding contract and you are entitled of expecting that it is of satisfactory quality, fit for purpose, and as described. (2) An older vehicle with high mileage may not be as good as a newer vehicle with low mileage, and it should still be fit for use on the road and in a condition that reflects its age and price.


 

(B)


 

(3) Traders cannot take away consumer’s rights by using terms such as 'sold as seen' or 'no refunds'. (4) You do not have the same legal rights if you buy a vehicle from a private seller or an auction. (5) If you buy a used vehicle from a trader online, you may have additional rights under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000.


 

(C)


 

(6) If the used vehicle is faultyyou have a short time after buying it to reject it. (7) You may have other remedies such as repair or replacement. (8) If the vehicle is faulty then you need to write to trader you bought it from. (9) You should confirm the details of your complaint and the remedy you are seeking and keep copies of all correspondence. (10) Like a last resort, you may need to consider taking court action. (11) Remember, used vehicles may have some faults, but they should not be excessive. (12) Fair wear and tear is not considered to be a fault.



Sentence 5:If you buy a used vehicle from a trader online, you may have additional rights under the Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000.

Which revision should be made to the placement of Sentence 5?
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 9 of 25

Question 10 of 25

10. Slash1. Which sentence uses the slash correctly?
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 10 of 25

Question 11 of 25

11. 2. Which choice shows the slash used correctly to rewrite the poem below?

“Hush, little sister
Please don't cry
I wish I could be there
To sing you a lullaby...”

[by Yerzinia]
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 11 of 25

Question 12 of 25

12. SubjectsWhich word is the subject in each sentence?
  1. Bob made his mother a writing desk in woodshop class.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 12 of 25

Question 13 of 25

13.

What can you do about a service done badly

 

(A)

 

 (1) If you get a service which isn’t carried out using reasonable care and skill, you may be entitled to do something about it. (2) For example, you may be able to get the trader to put things right or get a discount. (3) When you get a service carried out, such as a repair or having something made for you, consumer law gives you the right to have the service carried out with reasonable care and skill.

 

(B)

 

Telling the trader you're not happy with the service

 

(4) If you think the service has not been carried out with reasonable care and skill you should tell the trader straight away. (5) If you wait too long to complain you could be seen as accepting the faults and it will be more difficult for you to complain later on. (6) You should list the problems in writing, especially if there are lots of them. (7) If you are dealing with a shop or business, you may need to speak to the manager or director to sort the problem out. (8) Large shops or businesses may have a customer service department or manager.

 

(C)

 

Getting a discount

 

(9) If the problem is minor and you don't want to have it put right, one could just ask the trader to give you a discount on the price. (10) You should suggest a figure and see if the trader agrees. (11) You may need to ask an expert's opinion to work out how much discount you should ask for.

 

(D)

 

Getting the trader to put things right

 

(12) You should usually give the trader a chance to put things right. (13) You need to show you have been reasonable in case you have to go to court. (14) Some traders may not agree to put the problem right, or you might not wantto, for example if the work is of a very poor standard or is unsafe.

Sentence 5: If you wait too long to complain you could be seen as accepting the faults and it will be more difficult for you to complain later on.Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.

Question 13 of 25

Question 14 of 25

14.
  1. According to engineers, computers can give us an amazing amount of information about a car.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 14 of 25

Question 15 of 25

15. Which of the following passages contains one or more fragments?

A) I have never known anyone who was a better student than Paula. Who always did her homework in half the time I took.

B) The city’s water supply has been threatened. Very little rain having fallen during the past months.

C) Kipling’s poems have always appealed to me. Because of their strong rhythm.  And their rhyme.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 15 of 25

Question 16 of 25

16. 2. Which is the best rewrite to repair this run-on sentence?

The airport is about to shut down because of the snow and if the plane doesn't land soon it will have to go on to Boston.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 16 of 25

Question 17 of 25

17. Subject Verb Agreement
  1. Choose the sentence that has an error in subject-verb agreement.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 17 of 25

Question 18 of 25

18. Using the Correct Pronoun1. Choose the correct pronoun for the sentence.

My father and  ______ always go fishing on Saturday mornings.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 18 of 25

Question 19 of 25

19. Are the underlined words verbals in these sentences? Yes or no?I love to go skiing.

Question 19 of 25

Question 20 of 25

20. 3. Identify the participle in this sentence:

I wouldn’t stop playing until I got a winning score.

Question 20 of 25

Question 21 of 25

21. Find the indirect object this sentence.

SuperTech Corporation, the company (1) in charge of the conference (2), sent John (3) the agenda (4) for the first day’s meetings.
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 21 of 25

Question 22 of 25

22. Unequal Comparison Adverbs1. What determines if you use –er/-est or more/most to make the comparative or superlative forms?
A.
B.
C.
D.

Question 22 of 25

Question 23 of 25

23. Functions of ArticlesChoose from drop down menu the correct article [a, an, the] or  NO if no article should be used.

Jake took out  ______ Pepsi out of the refrigerator.

Question 23 of 25

Question 24 of 25

24. He drank the cold Pepsi from _____ bottle.

Question 24 of 25

Question 25 of 25

25. Pepsi always tastes better from (5) _____ bottle.

Question 25 of 25


 

Keep Calm and Just Graduate!

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Tips from recent successful GED students: You shouldn’t prepare for the entire GED exam at the same time. Just learn everything related to one subject area, pass the test, and then start learning for the next subject field. This way of learning will improve your success chances.

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