Practice Test – Language (RLA) set 1

These questions are written by our English Language guru and are similar to the GED Test. Each question has five answer choices. Choose the best answer for each question.

 

Question 1 of 25

1.

Are Employees Intangible Assets?

 

(A)

 

(1) An influential paper in the Harvard Business Review in 2004 noted that the skills and talents of a company’s workforce constitute an intangible asset – and that such assets ‘are worth far more to many companies than their tangible assets.’ (2) If your business has talented employees, you might well agree with this assessment. (3) But you can’t list the value of those talents as an asset on your balance sheet.

 

(B)

Tangible vs. Intangible Assets

 

(4) Your company’s assets fall into two categories: tangible and intangible. (5) Tangible assets are the ones you can touch: buildings, equipment, inventory and the like. (6) Financial resources also count as tangible; even though money is often just a number on a computer, it has a defined and universally agreed-upon value. (7) Intangible assets are the ones without a physical manifestation. (8) They include intellectual property such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, as well as market share, customer loyalty and human capital — the term for the talent and ability of the workforce.

 

(C)

People vs. Skills

 

 

(9) At first glance, it would seem that your employees are tangible assets. (10) After all, they’re standing right there in a physical form. (11) But while it’s common for businesses to describe their employees as valuable assets, it’s not really the employees — the flesh-and-blood individuals — that are the assets. (12) Rather, it’s their abilities. (13) When a talented, skilled worker leaves your company, you can’t replace her just by bringing in a warm body off the street. (14) You need someone with equivalent abilities. (15) The skill set of your company’s workers, more than the workers themselves, is an asset, and since abilities can’t be touched, it’s an intangible asset.

 

 

 

(D)

Accounting Treatment

 

 

(16) Whether your employees count as intangible assets is mostly a thought exercise, as you can’t include them as assets on your balance sheet. (17) U.S. accounting rules include a few overarching criteria for putting an asset on the balance sheet; The asset must have future economic benefits, and the company must either own the asset or have control equal to ownership. (18) Your employees’ skills undoubtedly have future economic benefit, but your company doesn’t own them. (19) That’s because the buyer is paying for your intangible assets, too. (20) Regardless of what you’ve invested in training your employees, their skills ultimately belong to them, not you. (21) Farther, accounting rules also stipulate that an asset can go on the balance sheet only if you can reliably assign an objective value to it. (22) You can’t do that with your employees’ skills; what they’re worth to you is not an objective value. (23) In fact, because of the difficulty — the impossibility, in many cases — in assigning a value to intangibles, the rules prohibit companies to put any ‘internally generated’ intangible assets on their balance sheets.

 

Cam Merritt, Demand Media

Sentence 19: That’s because the buyer is paying for your intangible assets, too.

Which revision should be made to the placement of Sentence 19?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 1 of 25

Question 2 of 25

2.

THE BOOK THIEF

                —Of course, an introduction. A beginning. Where are my manners? I could introduce myself properly, but it’s not really necessary. You will know me well enough and soon enough, depending on a diverse range of variables. It suffices to say that at some point in time, I will be standing over you, as genially as possible. Your soul will be in my arms. A color will be perched on my shoulder. I will carry you gently away.
At that moment, you will be lying there (I rarely find people standing up). You will be caked in your own body. There might be a discovery; a scream will dribble down the air. The only sound I’ll hear after that will be my own breathing, and the sound of the smell, of my footsteps.      The question is, what color will everything be at that moment when I come for you? What will the sky be saying?
Personally, I like a chocolate-colored sky. Dark, dark chocolate. People say it suits me. I do, however, try to enjoy every color I see — the whole spectrum. A billion or so flavors, none of them quite the same, and a sky to slowly suck on. It takes the edge off the stress. It helps me relax.

Markus Zusak, The Book Thief, Chapter 1

Which of the following words best describes the narrator’s attitude toward chocolate?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

Question 2 of 25

Question 3 of 25

3.

Are Employees Intangible Assets?

 

(A)

 

(1) An influential paper in the Harvard Business Review in 2004 noted that the skills and talents of a company’s workforce constitute an intangible asset – and that such assets ‘are worth far more to many companies than their tangible assets.’ (2) If your business has talented employees, you might well agree with this assessment. (3) But you can’t list the value of those talents as an asset on your balance sheet.

 

(B)

Tangible vs. Intangible Assets

 

(4) Your company’s assets fall into two categories: tangible and intangible. (5) Tangible assets are the ones you can touch: buildings, equipment, inventory and the like. (6) Financial resources also count as tangible; even though money is often just a number on a computer, it has a defined and universally agreed-upon value. (7) Intangible assets are the ones without a physical manifestation. (8) They include intellectual property such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, as well as market share, customer loyalty and human capital — the term for the talent and ability of the workforce.

 

(C)

People vs. Skills

 

 

(9) At first glance, it would seem that your employees are tangible assets. (10) After all, they’re standing right there in a physical form. (11) But while it’s common for businesses to describe their employees as valuable assets, it’s not really the employees — the flesh-and-blood individuals — that are the assets. (12) Rather, it’s their abilities. (13) When a talented, skilled worker leaves your company, you can’t replace her just by bringing in a warm body off the street. (14) You need someone with equivalent abilities. (15) The skill set of your company’s workers, more than the workers themselves, is an asset, and since abilities can’t be touched, it’s an intangible asset.

 

 

 

(D)

Accounting Treatment

 

 

(16) Whether your employees count as intangible assets is mostly a thought exercise, as you can’t include them as assets on your balance sheet. (17) U.S. accounting rules include a few overarching criteria for putting an asset on the balance sheet; The asset must have future economic benefits, and the company must either own the asset or have control equal to ownership. (18) Your employees’ skills undoubtedly have future economic benefit, but your company doesn’t own them. (19) That’s because the buyer is paying for your intangible assets, too. (20) Regardless of what you’ve invested in training your employees, their skills ultimately belong to them, not you. (21) Farther, accounting rules also stipulate that an asset can go on the balance sheet only if you can reliably assign an objective value to it. (22) You can’t do that with your employees’ skills; what they’re worth to you is not an objective value. (23) In fact, because of the difficulty — the impossibility, in many cases — in assigning a value to intangibles, the rules prohibit companies to put any ‘internally generated’ intangible assets on their balance sheets.

 

Cam Merritt, Demand Media

Sentence 21: Farther, accounting rules also stipulate that an asset can go on the balance sheet only if you can reliably assign an objective value to it.

Which correction should be made to Sentence 21?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 3 of 25

Question 4 of 25

4.

THE BOOK THIEF

 

                —Of course, an introduction. A beginning. Where are my manners? I could introduce myself properly, but it’s not really necessary. You will know me well enough and soon enough, depending on a diverse range of variables. It suffices to say that at some point in time, I will be standing over you, as genially as possible. Your soul will be in my arms. A color will be perched on my shoulder. I will carry you gently away.
At that moment, you will be lying there (I rarely find people standing up). You will be caked in your own body. There might be a discovery; a scream will dribble down the air. The only sound I’ll hear after that will be my own breathing, and the sound of the smell, of my footsteps.      The question is, what color will everything be at that moment when I come for you? What will the sky be saying?
Personally, I like a chocolate-colored sky. Dark, dark chocolate. People say it suits me. I do, however, try to enjoy every color I see — the whole spectrum. A billion or so flavors, none of them quite the same, and a sky to slowly suck on. It takes the edge off the stress. It helps me relax.

 

Markus Zusak, The Book Thief, Chapter 1

What does the narrator do to relax?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

Question 4 of 25

Question 5 of 25

5.

Are Employees Intangible Assets?

 

(A)

 

(1) An influential paper in the Harvard Business Review in 2004 noted that the skills and talents of a company’s workforce constitute an intangible asset – and that such assets ‘are worth far more to many companies than their tangible assets.’ (2) If your business has talented employees, you might well agree with this assessment. (3) But you can’t list the value of those talents as an asset on your balance sheet.

 

(B)

Tangible vs. Intangible Assets

 

(4) Your company’s assets fall into two categories: tangible and intangible. (5) Tangible assets are the ones you can touch: buildings, equipment, inventory and the like. (6) Financial resources also count as tangible; even though money is often just a number on a computer, it has a defined and universally agreed-upon value. (7) Intangible assets are the ones without a physical manifestation. (8) They include intellectual property such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, as well as market share, customer loyalty and human capital — the term for the talent and ability of the workforce.

 

(C)

People vs. Skills

 

(9) At first glance, it would seem that your employees are tangible assets. (10) After all, they’re standing right there in a physical form. (11) But while it’s common for businesses to describe their employees as valuable assets, it’s not really the employees — the flesh-and-blood individuals — that are the assets. (12) Rather, it’s their abilities. (13) When a talented, skilled worker leaves your company, you can’t replace her just by bringing in a warm body off the street. (14) You need someone with equivalent abilities. (15) The skill set of your company’s workers, more than the workers themselves, is an asset, and since abilities can’t be touched, it’s an intangible asset.

 

(D)

Accounting Treatment

 

(16) Whether your employees count as intangible assets is mostly a thought exercise, as you can’t include them as assets on your balance sheet. (17) U.S. accounting rules include a few overarching criteria for putting an asset on the balance sheet; The asset must have future economic benefits, and the company must either own the asset or have control equal to ownership. (18) Your employees’ skills undoubtedly have future economic benefit, but your company doesn’t own them. (19) That’s because the buyer is paying for your intangible assets, too. (20) Regardless of what you’ve invested in training your employees, their skills ultimately belong to them, not you. (21) Farther, accounting rules also stipulate that an asset can go on the balance sheet only if you can reliably assign an objective value to it. (22) You can’t do that with your employees’ skills; what they’re worth to you is not an objective value. (23) In fact, because of the difficulty — the impossibility, in many cases — in assigning a value to intangibles, the rules prohibit companies to put any ‘internally generated’ intangible assets on their balance sheets.

 

Cam Merritt, Demand Media

Sentence 23:In fact, because of the difficulty — the impossibility, in many cases — in assigning a value to intangibles, the rules prohibit companies to put any ‘internally generated’ intangible assets on their balance sheets.

Which correction should be made to Sentence 23?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 5 of 25

Question 6 of 25

6.

WHAT I REALLY WANT IS SOMEONE ROLLING AROUND IN THE TEXT

 

One day in college, I was trawling the library for a good book to read when I found a book called “How to Read a Book.” I tried to read it, but must have been doing something wrong, because it struck me as old-fashioned and dull, and I could get through only a tiny chunk of it. That chunk, however, contained a statement that changed my reading life forever. The author argued that you didn’t truly own a book (spiritually, intellectually) until you had marked it up.

 

This hit home for me — it spoke to the little scribal monk who lives deep in the scriptorium of my soul — and I quickly adopted the habit of marginalia: underlining memorable lines, writing keywords in blank spaces, jotting important page numbers inside of back covers. It was addictive, and useful; I liked being able to glance back through, say, “Great Expectations,” and discovering all of its great sentences already cued up for me. (Chapter 4, underlined: “I remember Mr. Hubble as a tough high-shouldered stooping old man, of a sawdusty fragrance, with his legs extraordinarily wide apart: so that in my short days I always saw some miles of open country between them when I met him coming up the lane.”) This wasn’t exactly radical behavior — marking up books, I’m pretty sure, is one of the Seven Undying Cornerstones of Highly Effective College Studying. But it quickly began to feel, for me, like something more intense: a way to not just passively read but to fully enter a text, to collaborate with it, to mingle with an author on some kind of primary textual plane.

 

Soon my little habit progressed into a full-on dependency. My markings grew more elaborate — I made stars, circles, checks, brackets, parentheses, boxes, dots and lines (straight, curved and jagged). I noted intra- and extra textual references; I measured cadences with stress marks. Texts that really grabbed me got full-blown essays (sideways, upside-down and diagonal) in the margins. I basically destroyed my favorite books with the pure logorrheic force of my excitement, spraying them so densely with scribbled insight that the markings almost ceased to have meaning. Today I rarely read anything — book, magazine, newspaper — without a writing instrument in hand. Books have become my journals, my critical notebooks, my creative outlets. Writing in them is the closest I come to regular meditation; marginalia is — no exaggeration — possibly the most pleasurable thing I do on a daily basis.

 

New York Times article by Sam Anderson

To what field does this article belong?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

Question 6 of 25

Question 7 of 25

7.

5 Things You Must Do to Prepare for a Video Interview

 

(A)

 

(1)  Here are five things you must do to prepare for a video interview. (2) Video interviews can be a great way to connect with a potential employer without having to travel, but they are full of potential pitfalls. (3) So if you’re asked to participate in a video interview, you’ll want to make sure you’re ready.

 

(B)

 

1. Check your tech

 

(4)Familiarize yourself with your webcam and microphone so you know how they work. (5) “Make sure that your audio and video come through clearly and that there are no technical issues on your end that would hinder your interview,” says Cheryl Palmer, owner of Call to Career.

 

(6) “Also, the camera should be at eye-level so that you are looking directly into the camera,” she explains. (7) “It won’t make a good first impression if you are seen as looking down or looking up when  speaking.”

 

(C)

 

2.Prep your surroundings

(8) You may think the only thing the people on the other end of a video interview can see is your face, but they will see some of your surroundings too, Palmer says. (9) “The room that you are in should look neat and attractive and not be visually distracting. (10) You also need to avoid any auditory distractions such as a barking dog or a crying child.” (11) Also be sure to turn off the ringers of all the phones in the area.

 

 

(12)  “Mistakes we’ve seen include video interviews recorded in a coffee shop with a very noisy background or in a bedroom with dirty laundry scattered on the floor,” says Michael Yinger, Aon Hewitt’s global lead for recruitment process outsourcing delivery. (14) “We’ve seen interviewees dressed in a robe and children playing in the vicinity. (15) And we’ve also seen a partially clad spouse running behind the person recording the interview.”

 

(D)

 

3. Look at your lighting

 

(16) Put a light behind your computer so your face is illuminated, Palmer says, and avoid casting shadows on your face. (17)  “One should also keep in mind that the lighting can make your face shiny, so make sure that you powder your face lightly (even if you’re a man),” she says.

 

 

(E)

 

4. Dress to impress

 

(18)  It may be tempting to go pantsless just to say you did, but it’s not a good idea. (19) “Even though you are not interviewing for the position in person, appearance still matters,” Palmer says. (19) “When interviewing for a professional position, you should still dress in a suit even though only your top will be seen.”

 

(F)

 

5. Sit where you can speak freely

 

(20) Don’t try to do a video interview from your current job if they don’t know you’re looking at new opportunities. (21) John Jakovenko, principal at the Jakovenko Group, says he had to sit through a video interview from a candidate who was hiding in a conference room and didn’t turn on the camera.

 

(22)  “This effectively turned the video interview into an awkward phone conversation where the interviewer was visible, but the candidate was not,” he says. (23) “The candidate was whispering so their employer didn’t find out they were interviewing. (24) This demonstrated that candidate did not have the courtesy to interview for another job offsite, and seemed to lack the technological skills to operate a webcam.”

 

Catherine Conlan, Monster Contributing Writer

Sentence 10: You also need to avoid any auditory distractions such as a barking dog or a child’s cry.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 7 of 25

Question 8 of 25

8.

WHAT I REALLY WANT IS SOMEONE ROLLING AROUND IN THE TEXT

 

One day in college, I was trawling the library for a good book to read when I found a book called “How to Read a Book.” I tried to read it, but must have been doing something wrong, because it struck me as old-fashioned and dull, and I could get through only a tiny chunk of it. That chunk, however, contained a statement that changed my reading life forever. The author argued that you didn’t truly own a book (spiritually, intellectually) until you had marked it up.

 

This hit home for me — it spoke to the little scribal monk who lives deep in the scriptorium of my soul — and I quickly adopted the habit of marginalia: underlining memorable lines, writing keywords in blank spaces, jotting important page numbers inside of back covers. It was addictive, and useful; I liked being able to glance back through, say, “Great Expectations,” and discovering all of its great sentences already cued up for me. (Chapter 4, underlined: “I remember Mr. Hubble as a tough high-shouldered stooping old man, of a sawdusty fragrance, with his legs extraordinarily wide apart: so that in my short days I always saw some miles of open country between them when I met him coming up the lane.”) This wasn’t exactly radical behavior — marking up books, I’m pretty sure, is one of the Seven Undying Cornerstones of Highly Effective College Studying. But it quickly began to feel, for me, like something more intense: a way to not just passively read but to fully enter a text, to collaborate with it, to mingle with an author on some kind of primary textual plane.

 

Soon my little habit progressed into a full-on dependency. My markings grew more elaborate — I made stars, circles, checks, brackets, parentheses, boxes, dots and lines (straight, curved and jagged). I noted intra- and extra textual references; I measured cadences with stress marks. Texts that really grabbed me got full-blown essays (sideways, upside-down and diagonal) in the margins. I basically destroyed my favorite books with the pure logorrheic force of my excitement, spraying them so densely with scribbled insight that the markings almost ceased to have meaning. Today I rarely read anything — book, magazine, newspaper — without a writing instrument in hand. Books have become my journals, my critical notebooks, my creative outlets. Writing in them is the closest I come to regular meditation; marginalia is — no exaggeration — possibly the most pleasurable thing I do on a daily basis.

 

New York Times article by Sam Anderson

What does the author think about marginalia? 
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

Question 8 of 25

Question 9 of 25

9.

5 Things You Must Do to Prepare for a Video Interview

 

(A)

 

(1)  Here are five things you must do to prepare for a video interview. (2) Video interviews can be a great way to connect with a potential employer without having to travel, but they are full of potential pitfalls. (3) So if you’re asked to participate in a video interview, you’ll want to make sure you’re ready.

 

(B)

 

1. Check your tech

 

(4)Familiarize yourself with your webcam and microphone so you know how they work. (5) “Make sure that your audio and video come through clearly and that there are no technical issues on your end that would hinder your interview,” says Cheryl Palmer, owner of Call to Career.

 

(6) “Also, the camera should be at eye-level so that you are looking directly into the camera,” she explains. (7) “It won’t make a good first impression if you are seen as looking down or looking up when  speaking.”

 

(C)

 

2.Prep your surroundings

(8) You may think the only thing the people on the other end of a video interview can see is your face, but they will see some of your surroundings too, Palmer says. (9) “The room that you are in should look neat and attractive and not be visually distracting. (10) You also need to avoid any auditory distractions such as a barking dog or a crying child.” (11) Also be sure to turn off the ringers of all the phones in the area.

 

 

(12)  “Mistakes we’ve seen include video interviews recorded in a coffee shop with a very noisy background or in a bedroom with dirty laundry scattered on the floor,” says Michael Yinger, Aon Hewitt’s global lead for recruitment process outsourcing delivery. (14) “We’ve seen interviewees dressed in a robe and children playing in the vicinity. (15) And we’ve also seen a partially clad spouse running behind the person recording the interview.”

 

(D)

 

3. Look at your lighting

 

(16) Put a light behind your computer so your face is illuminated, Palmer says, and avoid casting shadows on your face. (17)  “One should also keep in mind that the lighting can make your face shiny, so make sure that you powder your face lightly (even if you’re a man),” she says.

 

 

(E)

 

4. Dress to impress

 

(18)  It may be tempting to go pantsless just to say you did, but it’s not a good idea. (19) “Even though you are not interviewing for the position in person, appearance still matters,” Palmer says. (19) “When interviewing for a professional position, you should still dress in a suit even though only your top will be seen.”

 

(F)

 

5. Sit where you can speak freely

 

(20) Don’t try to do a video interview from your current job if they don’t know you’re looking at new opportunities. (21) John Jakovenko, principal at the Jakovenko Group, says he had to sit through a video interview from a candidate who was hiding in a conference room and didn’t turn on the camera.

 

(22)  “This effectively turned the video interview into an awkward phone conversation where the interviewer was visible, but the candidate was not,” he says. (23) “The candidate was whispering so their employer didn’t find out they were interviewing. (24) This demonstrated that candidate did not have the courtesy to interview for another job offsite, and seemed to lack the technological skills to operate a webcam.”

 

Catherine Conlan, Monster Contributing Writer

Sentence 17: “One should also keep in mind that the lighting can make your face shiny, so make sure that you powder your face lightly (even if you’re a man),” she says.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 9 of 25

Question 10 of 25

10.

WHAT I REALLY WANT IS SOMEONE ROLLING AROUND IN THE TEXT

 

One day in college, I was trawling the library for a good book to read when I found a book called “How to Read a Book.” I tried to read it, but must have been doing something wrong, because it struck me as old-fashioned and dull, and I could get through only a tiny chunk of it. That chunk, however, contained a statement that changed my reading life forever. The author argued that you didn’t truly own a book (spiritually, intellectually) until you had marked it up.

 

This hit home for me — it spoke to the little scribal monk who lives deep in the scriptorium of my soul — and I quickly adopted the habit of marginalia: underlining memorable lines, writing keywords in blank spaces, jotting important page numbers inside of back covers. It was addictive, and useful; I liked being able to glance back through, say, “Great Expectations,” and discovering all of its great sentences already cued up for me. (Chapter 4, underlined: “I remember Mr. Hubble as a tough high-shouldered stooping old man, of a sawdusty fragrance, with his legs extraordinarily wide apart: so that in my short days I always saw some miles of open country between them when I met him coming up the lane.”) This wasn’t exactly radical behavior — marking up books, I’m pretty sure, is one of the Seven Undying Cornerstones of Highly Effective College Studying. But it quickly began to feel, for me, like something more intense: a way to not just passively read but to fully enter a text, to collaborate with it, to mingle with an author on some kind of primary textual plane.

 

Soon my little habit progressed into a full-on dependency. My markings grew more elaborate — I made stars, circles, checks, brackets, parentheses, boxes, dots and lines (straight, curved and jagged). I noted intra- and extra textual references; I measured cadences with stress marks. Texts that really grabbed me got full-blown essays (sideways, upside-down and diagonal) in the margins. I basically destroyed my favorite books with the pure logorrheic force of my excitement, spraying them so densely with scribbled insight that the markings almost ceased to have meaning. Today I rarely read anything — book, magazine, newspaper — without a writing instrument in hand. Books have become my journals, my critical notebooks, my creative outlets. Writing in them is the closest I come to regular meditation; marginalia is — no exaggeration — possibly the most pleasurable thing I do on a daily basis.

 

New York Times article by Sam Anderson

In paragraph three, which of the following phrases most closely defines ‘scribbled insight?’
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

Question 10 of 25

Question 11 of 25

11.

5 Things You Must Do to Prepare for a Video Interview

 

(A)

 

(1)  Here are five things you must do to prepare for a video interview. (2) Video interviews can be a great way to connect with a potential employer without having to travel, but they are full of potential pitfalls. (3) So if you’re asked to participate in a video interview, you’ll want to make sure you’re ready.

 

(B)

 

1. Check your tech

 

(4)Familiarize yourself with your webcam and microphone so you know how they work. (5) “Make sure that your audio and video come through clearly and that there are no technical issues on your end that would hinder your interview,” says Cheryl Palmer, owner of Call to Career.

 

(6) “Also, the camera should be at eye-level so that you are looking directly into the camera,” she explains. (7) “It won’t make a good first impression if you are seen as looking down or looking up when  speaking.”

 

(C)

 

2.Prep your surroundings

(8) You may think the only thing the people on the other end of a video interview can see is your face, but they will see some of your surroundings too, Palmer says. (9) “The room that you are in should look neat and attractive and not be visually distracting. (10) You also need to avoid any auditory distractions such as a barking dog or a crying child.” (11) Also be sure to turn off the ringers of all the phones in the area.

 

 

(12)  “Mistakes we’ve seen include video interviews recorded in a coffee shop with a very noisy background or in a bedroom with dirty laundry scattered on the floor,” says Michael Yinger, Aon Hewitt’s global lead for recruitment process outsourcing delivery. (14) “We’ve seen interviewees dressed in a robe and children playing in the vicinity. (15) And we’ve also seen a partially clad spouse running behind the person recording the interview.”

 

(D)

 

3. Look at your lighting

 

(16) Put a light behind your computer so your face is illuminated, Palmer says, and avoid casting shadows on your face. (17)  “One should also keep in mind that the lighting can make your face shiny, so make sure that you powder your face lightly (even if you’re a man),” she says.

 

 

(E)

 

4. Dress to impress

 

(18)  It may be tempting to go pantsless just to say you did, but it’s not a good idea. (19) “Even though you are not interviewing for the position in person, appearance still matters,” Palmer says. (19) “When interviewing for a professional position, you should still dress in a suit even though only your top will be seen.”

 

(F)

 

5. Sit where you can speak freely

 

(20) Don’t try to do a video interview from your current job if they don’t know you’re looking at new opportunities. (21) John Jakovenko, principal at the Jakovenko Group, says he had to sit through a video interview from a candidate who was hiding in a conference room and didn’t turn on the camera.

 

(22)  “This effectively turned the video interview into an awkward phone conversation where the interviewer was visible, but the candidate was not,” he says. (23) “The candidate was whispering so their employer didn’t find out they were interviewing. (24) This demonstrated that candidate did not have the courtesy to interview for another job offsite, and seemed to lack the technological skills to operate a webcam.”

 

Catherine Conlan, Monster Contributing Writer

Sentence 24: This demonstrated that candidate did not have the courtesy to interview for another job offsite, and seemed he lacked the technological skills to operate a webcam.

The most effective revision of Sentence 24 would include which group of words?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 11 of 25

Question 12 of 25

12.

WHAT I REALLY WANT IS SOMEONE ROLLING AROUND IN THE TEXT

 

One day in college, I was trawling the library for a good book to read when I found a book called “How to Read a Book.” I tried to read it, but must have been doing something wrong, because it struck me as old-fashioned and dull, and I could get through only a tiny chunk of it. That chunk, however, contained a statement that changed my reading life forever. The author argued that you didn’t truly own a book (spiritually, intellectually) until you had marked it up.

 

This hit home for me — it spoke to the little scribal monk who lives deep in the scriptorium of my soul — and I quickly adopted the habit of marginalia: underlining memorable lines, writing keywords in blank spaces, jotting important page numbers inside of back covers. It was addictive, and useful; I liked being able to glance back through, say, “Great Expectations,” and discovering all of its great sentences already cued up for me. (Chapter 4, underlined: “I remember Mr. Hubble as a tough high-shouldered stooping old man, of a sawdusty fragrance, with his legs extraordinarily wide apart: so that in my short days I always saw some miles of open country between them when I met him coming up the lane.”) This wasn’t exactly radical behavior — marking up books, I’m pretty sure, is one of the Seven Undying Cornerstones of Highly Effective College Studying. But it quickly began to feel, for me, like something more intense: a way to not just passively read but to fully enter a text, to collaborate with it, to mingle with an author on some kind of primary textual plane.

 

Soon my little habit progressed into a full-on dependency. My markings grew more elaborate — I made stars, circles, checks, brackets, parentheses, boxes, dots and lines (straight, curved and jagged). I noted intra- and extra textual references; I measured cadences with stress marks. Texts that really grabbed me got full-blown essays (sideways, upside-down and diagonal) in the margins. I basically destroyed my favorite books with the pure logorrheic force of my excitement, spraying them so densely with scribbled insight that the markings almost ceased to have meaning. Today I rarely read anything — book, magazine, newspaper — without a writing instrument in hand. Books have become my journals, my critical notebooks, my creative outlets. Writing in them is the closest I come to regular meditation; marginalia is — no exaggeration — possibly the most pleasurable thing I do on a daily basis.

 

New York Times article by Sam Anderson

How does the author feel about making markings in books?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

Question 12 of 25

Question 13 of 25

13.

 

 132 Roosvelt Street

Fair Valley, CO

April13, 2008

To Whom It May Concern:

(A)

(1) It is with great pleasure that I am recommending Anne Thomson to you. (2) I am the Head Sales Manager at Vacuums Plus and Anne has been under my supervision from March of 2002 to February of 2008 as a saleswoman.

(B)

(3) Anne would be a great asset to any company. (4) She is one of the brightest employees I have ever had. (5) She also has a great drive and passion for her work.

(C)

(6) Anne is such a quick learner. (7) Within her first two weeks at Vacuums Plus she had learned all the product names, their features, and how they work. (8) It normally takes a new employee at least two months to get familiar with all the products that we sell.

(D)

(9) Anne’s drive has led her to great success at Vacuums Plus. (10) She had had the honor of receiving the ‘Top Sales Person of the Month Award’ ten times in her last year at Vacuums Plus, which is a feat that no employee has ever achieved here before.

(E)

(11) I believe that Anne Thomson will be an excellent fit for your company. (12) Anne has been nothing short of an exemplary employee. (13) If you have any further questions, feel free to contact me at (124) 346-598 and I’ll be happy to answer any questions you have.

Sincerely,

Signature

James Seago
Head Sales Manager

Sentence 2: I am the Head Sales Manager at Vacuums Plus and Anne had been under my supervision from March of 2002 to February of 2008 as a saleswoman.

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 13 of 25

Question 14 of 25

14.

Allegations of Abuse in Animal Testing

 

 (A)

 

(1) Despite animal testing being rigidly regulated in the United Kingdom (UK) and in many other places around the world, allegations of abuse have darkened the public perceptions of animal testing. (2) Allegations have occurred in numerous countries and have shown the dangerous and cruel side of animal testing. (3) Fortunately, the reaction in most cases has been swift, with strong repercussions from the government and an intense backlash from the public. (4) The unfortunate aspect is that these isolated cases of abuse are often taken as representative of all researchers who use animal testing to perform experiments.

 

(B)

In the United Kingdom (UK)

 

(5) In a case during the late 1990s, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) recorded a video of animal abuse at the Huntingdon Life Sciences facility in the UK. (6) Employees were recorded striking dogs and yelling at them as well as simulating sex acts during the taking of blood samples. (7) The consequences included the license for the HLS being removed for a period of six months and the staff involved were all fired and prosecuted for their part in the abuse.

 

(C)

United States

 

(8) One controversial case occurred in California, where a monkey that was bred at the University of California, Riverside, had his eyelids sewn shut and a unique device placed on his head. (9) The two conditions were created to satisfy the requirements for a sight-deprivation experiment. (10) It was only during a raid on the facilities by the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) that the monkey was removed. (11) In defence, the university alleged that damage to the monkey’s eyelids was, in fact, caused by the ALF’s veterinarian. (12) The University also alleged that the head device was purposefully damaged by the ALF as a means to further their cause.

 

(D)

 

(13) Unfortunately, abuse does occur and sadly, this abuse and subsequent media coverage tends to amplify the problem into one that is falsely assumed to include all animal testing facilities. (14) It is hoped that improved transparency, accountability and regulations will ensure that those who do abuse animals is held fully responsible. (15) Regulatory agencies exist to ensure that animal testing facilities respect the laws and rules in place to safeguard animal welfare.

 

Ian Murnaghan, www.aboutanimaltesting.co.uk

Sentence 7: The consequences included the license for the HLS being removed for a period of six months and the staff involved were all fired and prosecuted for his part in the abuse.

Which correction should be made to Sentence 7?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 14 of 25

Question 15 of 25

15.

Allegations of Abuse in Animal Testing

 

 (A)

 

(1) Despite animal testing being rigidly regulated in the United Kingdom (UK) and in many other places around the world, allegations of abuse have darkened the public perceptions of animal testing. (2) Allegations have occurred in numerous countries and have shown the dangerous and cruel side of animal testing. (3) Fortunately, the reaction in most cases has been swift, with strong repercussions from the government and an intense backlash from the public. (4) The unfortunate aspect is that these isolated cases of abuse are often taken as representative of all researchers who use animal testing to perform experiments.

 

(B)

In the United Kingdom (UK)

 

(5) In a case during the late 1990s, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) recorded a video of animal abuse at the Huntingdon Life Sciences facility in the UK. (6) Employees were recorded striking dogs and yelling at them as well as simulating sex acts during the taking of blood samples. (7) The consequences included the license for the HLS being removed for a period of six months and the staff involved were all fired and prosecuted for their part in the abuse.

 

(C)

United States

 

(8) One controversial case occurred in California, where a monkey that was bred at the University of California, Riverside, had his eyelids sewn shut and a unique device placed on his head. (9) The two conditions were created to satisfy the requirements for a sight-deprivation experiment. (10) It was only during a raid on the facilities by the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) that the monkey was removed. (11) In defence, the university alleged that damage to the monkey’s eyelids was, in fact, caused by the ALF’s veterinarian. (12) The University also alleged that the head device was purposefully damaged by the ALF as a means to further their cause.

 

(D)

 

(13) Unfortunately, abuse does occur and sadly, this abuse and subsequent media coverage tends to amplify the problem into one that is falsely assumed to include all animal testing facilities. (14) It is hoped that improved transparency, accountability and regulations will ensure that those who do abuse animals is held fully responsible. (15) Regulatory agencies exist to ensure that animal testing facilities respect the laws and rules in place to safeguard animal welfare.

 

Ian Murnaghan, www.aboutanimaltesting.co.uk

Sentence 12: The University also alleged that the head device was purposefully damaged by the ALF as a means to further their cause.

If you rewrote Sentence 12 beginning with

The head device was alleged

The next words should be

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 15 of 25

Question 16 of 25

16.

Allegations of Abuse in Animal Testing

 

 (A)

 

(1) Despite animal testing being rigidly regulated in the United Kingdom (UK) and in many other places around the world, allegations of abuse have darkened the public perceptions of animal testing. (2) Allegations have occurred in numerous countries and have shown the dangerous and cruel side of animal testing. (3) Fortunately, the reaction in most cases has been swift, with strong repercussions from the government and an intense backlash from the public. (4) The unfortunate aspect is that these isolated cases of abuse are often taken as representative of all researchers who use animal testing to perform experiments.

 

(B)

In the United Kingdom (UK)

 

(5) In a case during the late 1990s, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) recorded a video of animal abuse at the Huntingdon Life Sciences facility in the UK. (6) Employees were recorded striking dogs and yelling at them as well as simulating sex acts during the taking of blood samples. (7) The consequences included the license for the HLS being removed for a period of six months and the staff involved were all fired and prosecuted for their part in the abuse.

 

(C)

United States

 

(8) One controversial case occurred in California, where a monkey that was bred at the University of California, Riverside, had his eyelids sewn shut and a unique device placed on his head. (9) The two conditions were created to satisfy the requirements for a sight-deprivation experiment. (10) It was only during a raid on the facilities by the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) that the monkey was removed. (11) In defence, the university alleged that damage to the monkey’s eyelids was, in fact, caused by the ALF’s veterinarian. (12) The University also alleged that the head device was purposefully damaged by the ALF as a means to further their cause.

 

(D)

 

(13) Unfortunately, abuse does occur and sadly, this abuse and subsequent media coverage tends to amplify the problem into one that is falsely assumed to include all animal testing facilities. (14) It is hoped that improved transparency, accountability and regulations will ensure that those who do abuse animals is held fully responsible. (15) Regulatory agencies exist to ensure that animal testing facilities respect the laws and rules in place to safeguard animal welfare.

 

Ian Murnaghan, www.aboutanimaltesting.co.uk

Sentence 13: Unfortunately, abuse does occur and sadly, this abuse and subsequent media coverage tends to amplify the problem into one that is falsely assumed to include all animal testing facilities.

Which correction should be made to Sentence 13?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 16 of 25

Question 17 of 25

17.

Allegations of Abuse in Animal Testing

 

 (A)

 

(1) Despite animal testing being rigidly regulated in the United Kingdom (UK) and in many other places around the world, allegations of abuse have darkened the public perceptions of animal testing. (2) Allegations have occurred in numerous countries and have shown the dangerous and cruel side of animal testing. (3) Fortunately, the reaction in most cases has been swift, with strong repercussions from the government and an intense backlash from the public. (4) The unfortunate aspect is that these isolated cases of abuse are often taken as representative of all researchers who use animal testing to perform experiments.

 

(B)

In the United Kingdom (UK)

 

(5) In a case during the late 1990s, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) recorded a video of animal abuse at the Huntingdon Life Sciences facility in the UK. (6) Employees were recorded striking dogs and yelling at them as well as simulating sex acts during the taking of blood samples. (7) The consequences included the license for the HLS being removed for a period of six months and the staff involved were all fired and prosecuted for their part in the abuse.

 

(C)

United States

 

(8) One controversial case occurred in California, where a monkey that was bred at the University of California, Riverside, had his eyelids sewn shut and a unique device placed on his head. (9) The two conditions were created to satisfy the requirements for a sight-deprivation experiment. (10) It was only during a raid on the facilities by the Animal Liberation Front (ALF) that the monkey was removed. (11) In defence, the university alleged that damage to the monkey’s eyelids was, in fact, caused by the ALF’s veterinarian. (12) The University also alleged that the head device was purposefully damaged by the ALF as a means to further their cause.

 

(D)

 

(13) Unfortunately, abuse does occur and sadly, this abuse and subsequent media coverage tends to amplify the problem into one that is falsely assumed to include all animal testing facilities. (14) It is hoped that improved transparency, accountability and regulations will ensure that those who do abuse animals is held fully responsible. (15) Regulatory agencies exist to ensure that animal testing facilities respect the laws and rules in place to safeguard animal welfare.

 

Ian Murnaghan, www.aboutanimaltesting.co.uk

Sentence 14: It is hoped that improved transparency, accountability and regulations will ensure that those who do abuse animals is held fully responsible.

 

Which correction should be made to Sentence 14?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 17 of 25

Question 18 of 25

18.

 It was the 6th of May, a day which corresponds to the 6th of November in the countries of the Northern Hemisphere. The sky had been obscured for some days, and it was of importance to make preparations for the winter. However, the temperature was not as yet much lower, and a centigrade thermometer, transported to Lincoln Island, would still have marked an average of ten to twelve degrees above zero. This was not surprising, since Lincoln Island, probably situated between the thirty-fifth and fortieth parallel, would be subject, in the Southern Hemisphere, to the same climate as Sicily or Greece in the Northern Hemisphere. But as Greece and Sicily have severe cold, producing snow and ice, so doubtless would Lincoln Island in the severest part of the winter and it was advisable to provide against it.

In any case if cold did not yet threaten [those who are stranded], the rainy season would begin, and on this lonely island, exposed to all the fury of the elements, in mid-ocean, bad weather would be frequent, and probably terrible. The question of a more comfortable dwelling than the Chimneys must therefore be seriously considered and promptly resolved on.

Jules Verne, “The Mysterious Island,” 1874

Why would the narrator equate the 6th of May to the 6th of November in the first paragraph?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 18 of 25

Question 19 of 25

19.

 It was the 6th of May, a day which corresponds to the 6th of November in the countries of the Northern Hemisphere. The sky had been obscured for some days, and it was of importance to make preparations for the winter. However, the temperature was not as yet much lower, and a centigrade thermometer, transported to Lincoln Island, would still have marked an average of ten to twelve degrees above zero. This was not surprising, since Lincoln Island, probably situated between the thirty-fifth and fortieth parallel, would be subject, in the Southern Hemisphere, to the same climate as Sicily or Greece in the Northern Hemisphere. But as Greece and Sicily have severe cold, producing snow and ice, so doubtless would Lincoln Island in the severest part of the winter and it was advisable to provide against it.


In any case if cold did not yet threaten [those who are stranded], the rainy season would begin, and on this lonely island, exposed to all the fury of the elements, in mid-ocean, bad weather would be frequent, and probably terrible. The question of a more comfortable dwelling than the Chimneys must therefore be seriously considered and promptly resolved on.



Jules Verne, “The Mysterious Island,” 1874



Which of the following is not something the narrator knows about his situation?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 19 of 25

Question 20 of 25

20.

SHOULD WE REFRAIN FROM JUDGING PEOPLE?

 

In my younger and vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.

 

“Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

 

He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought – frequently I had feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parceled out unequally at birth.

 

And, after boasting this way of my tolerance, I came to the admission that it has a limit. Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes, but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on. When I came back from the East last autumn, I felt that I wanted the world to be in uniform and at a sort of moral attention forever; I wanted no more riotous excursions with privileged glimpses into the human heart. Only Gatsby, the man to this book, was exempt from my reaction – Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.

 

Francis Scott Fitzgerald, “The Great Gatsby, 1925

In the third paragraph the narrator says, ‘…for the intimate revelations of young men, at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions.’ Which of these is NOT implied in these lines?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 20 of 25

Question 21 of 25

21.

SHOULD WE REFRAIN FROM JUDGING PEOPLE?

 

In my younger and vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.

 

“Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

 

He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought – frequently I had feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parceled out unequally at birth.

 

And, after boasting this way of my tolerance, I came to the admission that it has a limit. Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes, but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on. When I came back from the East last autumn, I felt that I wanted the world to be in uniform and at a sort of moral attention forever; I wanted no more riotous excursions with privileged glimpses into the human heart. Only Gatsby, the man to this book, was exempt from my reaction – Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.

 

Francis Scott Fitzgerald, “The Great Gatsby, 1925

What ‘fundamental decencies’ does the narrator refer to in this particular situation?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 21 of 25

Question 22 of 25

22.

SHOULD WE REFRAIN FROM JUDGING PEOPLE?

 

In my younger and vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.

 

“Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

 

He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought – frequently I had feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parceled out unequally at birth.

 

And, after boasting this way of my tolerance, I came to the admission that it has a limit. Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes, but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on. When I came back from the East last autumn, I felt that I wanted the world to be in uniform and at a sort of moral attention forever; I wanted no more riotous excursions with privileged glimpses into the human heart. Only Gatsby, the man to this book, was exempt from my reaction – Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.

 

Francis Scott Fitzgerald, “The Great Gatsby, 1925

What can you infer about the narrator’s personality through his words, “Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes, but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on.” ?

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 22 of 25

Question 23 of 25

23.

SHOULD WE REFRAIN FROM JUDGING PEOPLE?

 

In my younger and vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.

 

“Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

 

He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought – frequently I had feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parceled out unequally at birth.

 

And, after boasting this way of my tolerance, I came to the admission that it has a limit. Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes, but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on. When I came back from the East last autumn, I felt that I wanted the world to be in uniform and at a sort of moral attention forever; I wanted no more riotous excursions with privileged glimpses into the human heart. Only Gatsby, the man to this book, was exempt from my reaction – Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.

 

Francis Scott Fitzgerald, “The Great Gatsby, 1925

What change occurred with the narrator after his return from the East?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 23 of 25

Question 24 of 25

24.

SHOULD WE REFRAIN FROM JUDGING PEOPLE?

 

In my younger and vulnerable years, my father gave me some advice that I’ve been turning over in my mind ever since.

 

“Whenever you feel like criticizing any one,” he told me, “just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.”

 

He didn’t say any more, but we’ve always been unusually communicative in a reserved way, and I understood that he meant a great deal more than that. In consequence, I’m inclined to reserve all judgments, a habit that has opened up many curious natures to me and also made me the victim of not a few veteran bores. The abnormal mind is quick to detect and attach itself to this quality when it appears in a normal person, and so it came about that in college I was unjustly accused of being a politician, because I was privy to the secret griefs of wild, unknown men. Most of the confidences were unsought – frequently I had feigned sleep, preoccupation, or a hostile levity when I realized by some unmistakable sign that an intimate revelation was quivering on the horizon; for the intimate revelations of young men, at least the terms in which they express them, are usually plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions. Reserving judgments is a matter of infinite hope. I am still a little afraid of missing something if I forget that, as my father snobbishly suggested, and I snobbishly repeat, a sense of the fundamental decencies is parceled out unequally at birth.

 

And, after boasting this way of my tolerance, I came to the admission that it has a limit. Conduct may be founded on the hard rock or the wet marshes, but after a certain point I don’t care what it’s founded on. When I came back from the East last autumn. I felt that I wanted the world to be in uniform and at a sort of moral attention forever; I wanted no more riotous excursions with privileged glimpses into the human heart. Only Gatsby, the man to this book, was exempt from my reaction – Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.

 

Francis Scott Fitzgerald, “The Great Gatsby, 1925

What does the narrator suggest with the words, ‘Only Gatsby, the man to this book, was exempt from my reaction – Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have an unaffected scorn.’? 

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 24 of 25

Question 25 of 25

25.

Are Employees Intangible Assets?

 

(A)

 

(1) An influential paper in the Harvard Business Review in 2004 noted that the skills and talents of a company’s workforce constitute an intangible asset – and that such assets ‘are worth far more to many companies than their tangible assets.’ (2) If your business has talented employees, you might well agree with this assessment. (3) But you can’t list the value of those talents as an asset on your balance sheet.

 

(B)

Tangible vs. Intangible Assets

 

(4) Your company’s assets fall into two categories: tangible and intangible. (5) Tangible assets are the ones you can touch: buildings, equipment, inventory and the like. (6) Financial resources also count as tangible; even though money is often just a number on a computer, it has a defined and universally agreed-upon value. (7) Intangible assets are the ones without a physical manifestation. (8) They include intellectual property such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, as well as market share, customer loyalty and human capital — the term for the talent and ability of the workforce.

 

(C)

People vs. Skills

(9) At first glance, it would seem that your employees are tangible assets. (10) After all, they’re standing right there in a physical form. (11) But while it’s common for businesses to describe their employees as valuable assets, it’s not really the employees — the flesh-and-blood individuals — that are the assets. (12) Rather, it’s their abilities. (13) When a talented, skilled worker leaves your company, you can’t replace her just by bringing in a warm body off the street. (14) You need someone with equivalent abilities. (15) The skill set of your company’s workers, more than the workers themselves, is an asset, and since abilities can’t be touched, it’s an intangible asset.

 

(D)

Accounting Treatment

 

(16) Whether your employees count as intangible assets is mostly a thought exercise, as you can’t include them as assets on your balance sheet. (17) U.S. accounting rules include a few overarching criteria for putting an asset on the balance sheet; The asset must have future economic benefits, and the company must either own the asset or have control equal to ownership. (18) Your employees’ skills undoubtedly have future economic benefit, but your company doesn’t own them. (19) That’s because the buyer is paying for your intangible assets, too. (20) Regardless of what you’ve invested in training your employees, their skills ultimately belong to them, not you. (21) Farther, accounting rules also stipulate that an asset can go on the balance sheet only if you can reliably assign an objective value to it. (22) You can’t do that with your employees’ skills; what they’re worth to you is not an objective value. (23) In fact, because of the difficulty — the impossibility, in many cases — in assigning a value to intangibles, the rules prohibit companies to put any ‘internally generated’ intangible assets on their balance sheets.

 

Cam Merritt, Demand Media

Sentence 8: They include intellectual property such as patents, trademarks and copyrights, as well as market share, customer loyalty and human capital –– the term for the talent and ability of the workforce.

 

Which is the best way to write the underlined portion of this sentence? If the original is the best way, choose option (1).

A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
E.  

Question 25 of 25


 

These practice tests are part of our GED online prep, click here to read how it works. The real purpose of GED practice tests is to find out on which subjects  you need to focus. Bear in mind that most of the time the real GED, HiSET, or TASC is more difficult than the these practice test.

Disclaimer This practice test is not related to the Official GED Practice Test™ produced and distributed by the American Council on Education (ACE) and the GED Testing Service. ACE and GED Testing Service LLC have not approved, authorized, endorsed, been involved in the development of, or licensed the substantive content of this practice test.

 




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