Knowing how to properly prepare for your college education is the key to avoiding stress and acing every single one of your exams. We have useful prep tools for you.

 

How to Get into Your Dream College

Ever had a crush only to find out the other person liked you back the whole time? Make sure they know it! Colleges need to know you are interested before you submit the application with the
common app. This is called “demonstrated interest.” Demonstrated interest is currently ranked above interviews and class rank by most schools in determining which students to admit. The following steps will show your dream school you care and set the stage for a great relationship!

Keep reading to learn how to get into your dream college.  

 

The College Application Essay – What You Need To Know

I know this title sounds a bit dramatic, but it’s the truth – the college essay can truly make or break your acceptance into your dream school. With college application season upon us, seniors are scrambling to improve or enhance their applications however possible. Consider the fact that many applicants appear identical on the surface: similar GPA, similar courses, similar ACT scores, similar activities lists….. The crazy reality is that many other students out there have done the same things as you! So how do you stand out in a crowd of hundreds of other applicants? The college essay. Keep Reading. 

What is Common App + Best Ways To Use It

The Common App (common application) is the online college application that you can submit to over 600+ universities and colleges in place of the individual application of these schools. Even before you get your ACT test results you can get familiar with The Common App, so keep reading.

 

So, yes, you may feel nervous or anxious about making the final decision. Relax and enjoy the experience. You should feel excited about your options and the amazing four years that lie ahead. Follow the tips below when thinking about each school. It may help to compare your acceptances side by side and rank each school or make a list of pros and cons for each.

  • Visit the schools you are considering. If you have already visited once, consider going back. Visiting the school with the perspective of an admitted student may cause you to look at it in a whole new way. Not to mention, college campuses can change a lot from year to year. When you visit the school be sure to talk to students on campus, visit a class in session, and stop and sit for 30 minutes at a busy place on campus.
  • Talk to your friends, your parents, and your counselor. You will be the one ultimately making the decision but sometimes it can help to hear other people’s opinions. They may bring up points you hadn’t considered.
  • Consider if the school is an academic fit. Do they have a strong program in your major? If you are undecided, do they offer enough majors of interest? Are there are a variety of departments and courses that peak your interest? How will you handle the workload? Will you be challenged enough? Does the school offer programs like study abroad, research opportunities for undergrads or internships? What is the graduation rate? How do graduates do with job placement and graduate school acceptance?
  • Consider if the school is a social fit. How do you feel about the location? Are you close enough to home? How is the student body? Is there enough diversity? A balanced social scene? Do they offer a range of extra curricula? Do you feel comfortable with the surrounding city or town? If you are going out of state, is there a convenient airport for trips home?
  • Consider if the school is a financial fit. Can your family afford the cost of attendance with the financial plan you have been offered? Are there opportunities for work study or scholarships once you are a student? Does the campus or surrounding town offer job or internship opportunities? Will the school provide a good financial return for the investment?