Adverb Unequal Comparisons

Adverbs can be used to compare and contrast dissimilar actions. So, the comparative form of a word is used to compare two actions, and the superlative form of a word is used to refer to one in a group of three or more that is the outstanding example of the action. Don’t hesitate to also check our 236 free and powerful practice tests

The following transcript is provided for your convenience.

So, when we’re dealing with one syllable adverbs, we use the suffix “er” or “est“, or we use the words “less” or “least“.

So, say we have the word “late“. To get to the comparative form of the word “late“, we just add a suffix “er” to make it “later“.

So, if we have two people, and one person is late by an hour, and the other person is late by two hours, we would refer to the person late by two hours as being the “later” one.

And then, if we have three or more people, and one person is late by three hours, we would refer to them as being the “latest” person. So, that’s the superlative form, “latest“.

So, we’re just adding these suffixes, and really, in “later“, we’re just adding “r“, and then “latest“, we’re just adding “st“, because we already had “e” from “late“.

Now, to look at this in a more negative sense, you could use the words “less” or “least“.

So, you could refer to one person as being “less late“, and another person as being the “least late“.

Now, when you have an adverb with two or more syllables, you don’t use a suffix anymore. You just use the words “more” or “most“, or “less” or “least“.

So, we have the word “carefully“, and if two people both do something carefully, you would say that one person did it “more carefully“. And, you could also say that one person did it “less carefully“, depending on how you want to look at it.

And then also with the superlative form, if you have three or more, you would refer to one person as doing it the “most carefully“.

And then, you could refer to the person who wasn’t very careful as being the “least carefully“.

Now, we do have something called “irregular adverbs“, and what I mean by irregular is that they’re irregular in the way you form the comparative and superlative forms of the adverb.

So, for example, we have the word “well“. Now, the comparative form of the word “well” is “better“, and the superlative form is the “best“.

So, as you can see, “better” and “best” aren’t in any way close to the word “well“. So, you just have to be familiar with these irregular adverbs, and be familiar with how to form the comparative and superlative forms of those words.

So, again, adverbs can be used to compare and contrast dissimilar actions. And we use the comparative form when we’re comparing two actions, and we use the superlative form when we’re comparing three or more actions.

Practice tests help you remember. Take this mini-test to solidify your memory.

Mini-test: Unequal Comparison Adverbs 

What determines if you use –er/-est or more/most to make the comparative or superlative forms?
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
Choose the correct form

well
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
Choose the correct form

loudly
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  
Choose the correct form

soon
A.  
B.  
C.  
D.  

 

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